Breaking the Mold: What We’re NOT

As many of our members already know, Elite Sports Clubs are a little different than your typical “health club.” We often spend time explaining to new members who we are and what we do to help orient them to the club, but every so often the point tends to get across a little better by instead explaining what we’re NOT. Continue reading Breaking the Mold: What We’re NOT

Recreational Sports: The forgotten cardio workout

Can recreational sports be a supplementary part of your cardio workouts? I seem to be asking myself this question on a regular basis as I try to decide whether clients, and myself, should only participate in a workout designed for the fitness center. Would playing basketball three days a week be a good replacement for running on the treadmill?

As a sports junkie it is hard for me to continually run on a treadmill because it gets very monotonous with no chance of any of the conditions changing as I keep pounding away on that belt on the treadmill. Wouldn’t one rather take part in a sport during which the conditions constantly change, and still get the needed workout for your goals?

I am definitely an enthusiast for recreational sports as a part of your workout. It keeps one coming to the gym because they never know what will happen in a game of volleyball, basketball or even soccer at the club. Running on a treadmill or even using an elliptical would be great workouts as well, but as a “sports person” I can’t bring myself to participate in these activities on a regular basis.

If you are an individual that has been a sports enthusiast for much of your life it would make sense that you have trouble transitioning your workouts into a fitness center as you bypass your high school, and collegiate days on the courts. A typical fitness center or health club in general isn’t designed well for a former competitive athlete because everyone is there doing their own individual workouts. As athletes we are used to being a part of team workouts, or even competitions that bring us all closer together.

The best way we can get that feeling from our clubs is by participating in the recreational sports that our respective club may offer or even a group exercise class. For Elite Sports Clubs this could range all the way in the spectrum of sports from swimming, tennis, basketball, and volleyball to even indoor soccer in one of our Milwaukee Wave clinics. If one is used to the competitive spirit of sports then these recreational sports can at least help you offset your desire for competition. It is also a great way to get a workout in if you are an individual who only worked out because of sports in high school or college.

Men playing basketball photo

Playing basketball for an hour is an aerobic activity that can easily help offset running on a treadmill or using an elliptical machine. So, if you are someone who is looking for workouts that will not only challenge you physically, but also mentally then my club, Elite Sports Clubs, like many others offer opportunities to compete against others in a recreational sport of your choice.

Do you prefer machines for cardio or recreational sports? Does your health club offer recreational sports? How do you change up your treadmill runs, stationary bike rides or elliptical workouts to keep it new? Please share your comments.

Plus check out the recreational sports offered at Elite Sports Clubs.

Thank you,

Kyle Krogmann
Personal Trainer
Elite Sports Club-Mequon

How to Choose a Health Club

Choosing the right health club is very similar to buying/renting a home.  From the outside, most homes look very similar with bedrooms, a kitchen and bathrooms.  Unfortunately, when choosing a health club you do not have a realtor to point out the details.  There are a few questions that will help you choose the right health club for you.  It’s no secret that picking a quality club is key to sticking with your exercise program.

Is the location convenient to get to?  To be successful at your health club, it must be convenient for you.  Typically a club near your home, near work or near a place you travel to frequently–such as a school–works best for convenience.

Does the club have what you want?  Make a list of things before you tour a club that are important to your success at a health club–such as personal training, pools, tennis, exercise classes, childcare, towel service, etc.  If you are currently exercising, make sure you can do your exercises on the equipment provided in the health club.  If you do not currently exercise, make sure the health club staffs a personal trainer in the fitness center at all times to help you become accustomed to the equipment and answer questions.

Do the hours fit your lifestyle?  Think about when you are available to exercise and make sure the club is open during that time.  If you have children and you plan to bring them to the club, make sure childcare is available during that time as well.

How much does the membership cost?  Clubs vary in price and it is important to make sure you can afford the health club.  Do not write off the basic, low cost club or the high-end club as long as it is in a tolerable price range for you.  There may be hidden “intangibles” that you will find out about on a tour that might be worth the additional money or the basic health club may suit your needs and you do not want all the extras.  Besides the monthly membership fee, there are fees to beware of.  Is childcare an additional cost?  Is there a cost for group exercise classes?  Are lockers and towel service included?  The additional cost should be considered in your monthly membership fee even if it is not on the membership contract.  There is one question you must ask when you are discussing cost and contracts.  Does the health club “own” your contract or do they sell it to a third party?  In the latter case, there is little incentive to provide good service if the club does not “own” your contract.

The first four questions are the pre-qualifying questions to choosing the right health club.  This is like making sure your home has the right number of bedrooms, the appropriate garage space, enough bathrooms, etc.  Now it is time to narrow down the search and look at the intangibles of a club.

Can you try the club before joining?  It is important to try the club during the time you would normally use it.  You will be able to see how busy the fitness center is and make a more educated decision.

Does the clientele fit your lifestyle?  Health clubs are not just a place to exercise.  Health clubs provide a social circle for many people.  Make sure you are comfortable exercising around and with the other members.

Is the staff friendly and knowledgeable?  Did the front desk greet you?  Are the personal trainers certified?  Are the personal trainers college educated?  Ask the club if they have minimum requirements for their staff.

Here are a few other thought provoking questions to consider:

  1. Is the music too loud?
  2. Are there too many out of order signs?
  3. Do you need to sign up for group exercise classes?
  4. Do they offer a free orientation program when you join?
  5. Are towels and lockers provided?
  6. Are there a variety of programs to mix up your exercises?
  7. Are there personalized TVs on the cardio machines?

There is no perfect gym for everyone. Do your research, ask questions, be observant and know your goals and you’ll likely find a good fit.

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