Uncomfortable Truths About Fitness

Everyone likes when they’re told what they want to hear; things stay nice and comforting that way. Being told what you need to hear versus what you want to hear can be a little unsettling, but it can be to your benefit. With an abundance of fitness information online, you’re bound to run across some bogus advice. We’re here today to uncover some of the uncomfortable truths about fitness. You might not want to hear some of these things, but they need to be heard.

Continue reading Uncomfortable Truths About Fitness

Mid-Afternoon Snack Ideas to Kick that “2:30 Feeling”

By Rita Larsen, RDN; Elite Sports Clubs Nutrition Educator & Diet Counselor

During the course of our Team Weight Loss Challenge program, questions have come in from participants as to the best foods as snacks to include in their plan during the six week event. I thought I would share their comments and questions with you, in particular this one about snacking in the afternoon at work. Continue reading Mid-Afternoon Snack Ideas to Kick that “2:30 Feeling”

8 Alternatives to “Stress Eating”

By Rita Larsen, RD, CD; Elite Sports Clubs Nutrition Educator & Diet Counselor

8 Alternatives to Stress Eating

Many of us make quick, unplanned decisions regarding our eating choices. We may even avoid conscious thoughts about what is healthy and nutritious, and instead have the following internal conversations:

“I go to the gym every day and I work out hard. I feel entitled to spurge a little afterwards. I don’t feel anything is wrong with that, even if it is a trip to a fast food restaurant. I am truly hungry at the time…but later I realize a well-chosen breakfast at home might have been a better choice. I act without thinking some days and always in a hurry.”

“My life is really stressful. I work hard all day. I have many difficult decisions to make at work right now. My family life is very busy, not a lot of time to think about what I am putting in my mouth. Some days it is, well, anything.”

Does this sound like you? These are common themes for active people living active lives. But, this is not about what is good to eat or even what is good for you; but rather what to do in physical or emotional situations, besides eat. Continue reading 8 Alternatives to “Stress Eating”

Youth Fitness & Nutrition: Country Fruit Stand Salad Recipe

By Rita Larsen, Elite Sports Clubs Registered Dietitian & Nutrition Counselor

Country Fruit Stand Salad
Country Fruit Stand Salad, MrFood.com

This week we had a great opportunity to make a nutritious fruit salad with a tasty dressing for our students in the Scamp (Summer Day Camp) Kids Exercise & Nutrition ProgramChildren learned about the benefits of eating fruits high in antioxidants, especially berries of all varieties, such as, blackberries, strawberries, and raspberries. In addition, they learned how to make a tasty fruit-based dressing with orange juice and honey. The topping was an excellent cinnamon granola mixture. The children enjoyed the entire salad and helped me prepare the final mixture for tasting by the group.


Country Fruit Stand Salad

(Original Recipe)

Country Fruit Stand Salad gets its sparkling taste from a marinade of a combo of ginger ale, orange juice and honey. This unbeatable trio of flavors turns an ordinary fruit salad recipe into something special.

Serves: 10

Preparation Time: 35 min

What You’ll Need:

  • 1 medium to large cantaloupe, cut in half, seeds and rind removed
  • 1 medium to large honeydew melon, cut in half, seeds and rind removed
  • 1 medium to large pineapple, top removed, sliced into quarters, rind and core removed
  • 1 quart strawberries, washed and hulled (tops removed)
  • 3/4 cup ginger ale
  • 1/2 cup orange juice
  • 2 tablespoons honey
  • 1/2 cup granola

What To Do:

  1. Cut cantaloupe, honeydew, and pineapple into bite-sized pieces; place in a large  bowl.
  2. Cut strawberries in half (or in quarters, if they’re large); add to other fruit.
  3. In a small bowl, combine ginger ale, orange juice, and honey; mix well. Add to fruit; mix well.
  4. Allow fruit to “marry” for 15 to 20 minutes before serving. Serve immediately, or cover and chill until ready to use.
  5. Just before serving, sprinkle each serving with a bit of granola.

Note

The number of servings this makes will depend upon the size of the fruit you use.


We often send home recipes for children to try at home with their parents. Of course, the supervision will come from the parents; but we do often like to have the children do some assembly work and to actually be able to touch and feel the food.

If you and your children would like to discuss further healthy foods to prepare, family eating schedules and planning, please contact Rita Larsen for a family discussion of “HELP,” Healthy Eating for Life Program. This can be arranged by appointment at a convenient time and location for your entire family.

Have a good rest of the summer and enjoy these summer nights with a delicious healthy meal your whole family will enjoy having, time after time!

Four of the Best Foods You Should be Eating Regularly

By Rita Larsen, Elite Dietitian & Nutrition Counselor

For a long time, the American Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics has been speaking in very general terms to “eat a variety of foods.” Today, scientists are able to be more specific about their research in order to target those foods that will help you prevent certain kinds of illnesses and disease processes. These include heart disease, diabetes, and some cancers—and promote better overall health. You can look better and feel better, too, when you eat a healthy diet. So, consider putting some of these foods to use in your eating plan today, and every day!

Berries

Berries at Farmers Market

According to the American Cancer Society, foods rich in vitamin C may lower the risk of cancers of the gastrointestinal tract. The antioxidants in berries may help maintain normal communication of the neurons in your brain. Strawberries are an excellent source of vitamin C, and raspberries and blackberries are good sources too. Strawberries, blueberries, raspberries and blackberries are also low in calories and high in fiber.

Cruciferous Vegetables

Cruciferous Vegetables

Vegetables in this family contain compounds called glucosinolates, which are being studied for possible anticancer effects. A new laboratory study shows that compounds in cruciferous vegetables can selectively target and kill cancer cells while leaving normal, healthy cells unaffected. The family includes broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, brussel sprouts, kale, turnips, radishes and watercress.

Nuts

Nut bowl

Almonds are rich in vitamin E, an antioxidant that may help protect against heart disease and promote brain health. Some research suggests that nutrients such as vitamin E may be important in lowering the risk of Alzheimer’s disease. Nuts also are high in protein and fiber (but also in fat, so be careful with portion size).

Whole Grains

Whole GrainsIn contrast to refined grains, such as white flour and white rice, whole grains are rich in fiber, healthy fats, vitamins, minerals and phytochemicals. Eating whole instead of refined grains can help to lower cholesterol, triglycerides and insulin levels, decreasing the risk of heart disease. Eating whole grains can also reduce the risk of diabetes and improve digestive health. Refining wheat strips away significant amounts of vitamins B and E and virtually all of the fiber.

Courtesy of the American Cancer Society, and the Cotton—O’Neil Heart Center. Spring 2013, Heart Health News.

Sweet-and-Sour Savoy & Fennel Salad

Serves 4

Sweet Sour Savoy Fennel Salad

Ingredients:

• 1 ½ cups thinly sliced Savoy Cabbage (about 6 oz.) [or Napa Cabbage]
• 6 Tbs. Olive Oil
• ¾ lb. Fennel Bulb (sometimes called anise) stalks trimmed flush with bulb and bulb chopped fine (about ¾ cups)
• ¼ cup Water
• ¼ cup Cider Vinegar
• 1 cup Orange sections

Preparation:

1. Using a sharp knife cut cabbage and fennel in strips as you would for coleslaw.
2. Mix well.
3. Mix dressing ingredients together.
4. Pour over salad mixture.
5. Section orange and add.
6. Let set in refrigerator for 1 hour.
7. Serve chilled.

Looking for more recipes to add to you cookbook? Or just general guidance on how to incorporate the above foods into your daily menu? Get in touch with Rita, our Registered Dietitian at Elite Sports Clubs! Also, make sure you follow our other Nutrition blog posts for more great tips!

Berries, cruciferous veggies, nuts, and whole grains! Oh my! Do you eat foods from all of these categories on a regular basis? Tell us in the comments!