Member Stories: Eric Ensminger “110 Pounds Later-Racing with Friends, Inspiring Others”

We’re extremely proud of our members. Over the years their work out agendas and sporting endeavors serve as healthy examples of how it feels to be Elite, and how exercise not only adds years to your life, but life to your years! Today we’d like to highlight another member’s accomplishments:

No secret way to lose the weight and get fit – Diet and Exercise

I was 36 and not satisfied with a lot of things in my life. I was overweight with high blood pressure and high cholesterol. My family has a history of stroke and heart attack. To compound the issue, I was carrying a lot of stress due to work/life in-balance issues.

Elite Member Eric Ensminger

2006 – Time for a Change
I vowed that summer to lose 10 pounds by eating better and walking when I played golf. By September, I met that goal and set my mind on losing an additional 10 lbs. I continued to play more golf and ate healthy and limited alcohol. By November, I had lost another 10. The golf season was over and holidays were coming soon. I joined a gym and met with a personal trainer once. My workouts included walking and bike riding and by the end of 2006, I was 25 pounds down.

Elite Member Eric Ensminger

2007 – Plateau
My goal was a BMI of 23.5, center of the average range. That Spring I joined a Capoeira (Brazilian Kick Boxing) group. By May, I was frustrated. According to the charts my BMI had reached a plateau. For the second time, I met with my trainer. She accurately measured my body fat at 17.5. I had BLOWN past my goal. She was not surprised; I became an athlete. I was 60 lbs lighter than high school graduation.

Elite Member Eric Ensminger

In October, a friend suggested racing. Convinced I could do it, I registered for my first race and haven’t looked back.

2008 – Inspiration
I raced my first duathlon, 5K, triathlon; eight events in total. Late that season, I was in the top 20%.

Elite Member Eric Ensminger

I encouraged those around me to become healthier and more active. Some had never run before, started racing. Friends who were overweight said, “Eric if you could do it, so can I.”

2009 – Firsts
Half Marathon
Olympic distance triathlon
Teaching a beginning running class linked with weight loss
Biking and discussing slow foods with my daughter to show her the importance of a healthy lifestyle

Elite Member Eric Ensminger

2010 – Getting Ready for Ironman
Full marathon – 3 hours, 52 minutes
Half Ironman Triathlon – 5 hours, 39 minutes
Race the Lake – 90 mile bike race 3 hours, 50 minutes

2011 – The Year of a Lifetime
2012 Olympic Triathlon Course in London as a test event
Ironman Wisconsin
NYC Marathon

2012
Ironman Louiseville 96 degrees

Elite Member Eric Ensminger

2013
Planned Ironman Tahoe

Eric is an amazing example of what one can do with a little help and a lot of determination. Not only has he accomplished great things himself, but he has inspired others to do so as well. Congratulations Eric on your weight loss and racing success!

Submit your own “elite” story. Or tweet us @MyEliteStory with not just your major accomplishments, but also those little everyday wins too.

Why the Word Diet is Often Seen in a Negative Way

By Rita Larsen, Elite Sports Clubs Registered Dietitian & Nutrition Counselor Diet Vegetable Word

As early as the 1920’s, the American Academy of Nutrition began to speak about the changes you made in the foods that you ate, as your “diet.” That is; any change that you made to improve health or for the better was a good diet. Today, in a more popular way, we can often be seen discussing new and different diets and how they can help us achieve our personal goals, quickly. Some are healthy, some are not so healthy. It is possible that the only thing that makes the word diet seem negative, is how we treat a normally sound principle, like eating right. So, what are some of the things we do that will make diet a difficult process? After all, we are just trying to eat healthy and lose some weight, right? For example,

  • Many people feel they would like to fast for a day? That cleansing in this way with only liquids is a good plan. I have never worried about this too much because people do end up hungry. And, it may help to reduce body stores of calories, if you do not overeat the day after.
  • Some feel that waiting all day until they eat a meal will help them avoid kicking off some response to overwhelming hunger. As, “the longer I wait, the better it is.” You run a risk of becoming very hungry and overeating by the end of the day. After all, you did not eat ALL day.
  • Yet others feel that perhaps, they can avoid eating entire groups of foods; like carbohydrates or fats, to keep their unwanted pounds away. Science works fine on these concepts until we completely eliminate whole food groups. It does not work well and you may miss important nutrients.
  • Lastly, many feel that if they really bare down during the week, they can have a little extra on the weekend. Sorry to say, but it does not take much added food on the weekends to cause a plateau.

What is wrong here is the manipulation of the schedules, the timing, the food choices or lack thereof, that can make you feel tired and worn out as a result of doing any of these choices.

Your body wants to cooperate with anything you do! It “records” what you did yesterday, and tries to repeat it. But along the way, your metabolic rate is going to need to readjust downward to what you are doing, and what you thought you were trying to do, just became worse. Eat responsibly throughout the day, give your body fuel to work on, don’t store too much for another day, and feel proud that you have eaten what your body needs to go another mile!

Want more advice on dieting in it’s true form? Let us know, by filling out this form and telling us a little more about you and your goals!

What does the word “diet” mean to you? Tell us in the comments!

This Week is National Women’s Health Week!

National Women’s Health Week, which runs May 12th -18th, is a campaign by the Department of Health and Human Services Office on Women’s Health to raise awareness about women’s health issues. NWHW promotes 5 steps for women to improve their physical and mental health, including preventive health screening, healthy eating, sleep and stress management, and regular exercise. The health club is a safe, social, and supportive environment providing numerous resources to help women get active and adopt healthier habits.